Author Archives: TVHerrewege

The Nile Crocodile, 2021. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 71 x 61 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Indian Rhinoceros, 2021. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 61 x 71 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Northern White Rhinoceros, 2021. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 61 x 71 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Nile Crocodile, 2021. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 160 x 140 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Hippopotamus, 2021. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 160 x 140 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Grizzly Bear, 2021. Charcoal and chalk on canvas. 87 x 72

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Grizzly Bear, 2021. Charcoal and chalk on canvas. 71 x 61 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Hippopotamus, 2021. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 71 x 61 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

Breach 4, 2020. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 86 x 72 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Breach series is based on photographs of Great White Sharks breaching whilst hunting and displaying their incredible physicality. They are a terrifying site yet also bare a sense of vulnerability out of the water and suspended in time like this. I have repeated the Jaws movie poster image across all pieces and there are other drawn elements around the sharks that relate to scare mongering ideas from the many other ‘shark movies’ made in recent years and the reality of what is pushing these incredible predators towards extinction.

Breach 3, 2020. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 86 x 72 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Breach series is based on photographs of Great White Sharks breaching whilst hunting and displaying their incredible physicality. They are a terrifying site yet also bare a sense of vulnerability out of the water and suspended in time like this. I have repeated the Jaws movie poster image across all pieces and there are other drawn elements around the sharks that relate to scare mongering ideas from the many other ‘shark movies’ made in recent years and the reality of what is pushing these incredible predators towards extinction.

Breach 2, 2020. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 86 x 72 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Breach series is based on photographs of Great White Sharks breaching whilst hunting and displaying their incredible physicality. They are a terrifying site yet also bare a sense of vulnerability out of the water and suspended in time like this. I have repeated the Jaws movie poster image across all pieces and there are other drawn elements around the sharks that relate to scare mongering ideas from the many other ‘shark movies’ made in recent years and the reality of what is pushing these incredible predators towards extinction.

Breach 1, 2020. Charcoal and chalk on primed canvas. 86 x 72 cm.

With these artworks I begin creating an initial image of an animal and try to capture a true to life realism of the particular species rendered in charcoal. When I am happy with the initial drawing I then begin layering fine line drawings in chalk over the top that show how the animal is understood by humanity and also how humanity effects the animal. The  layering of imagery across the surface functions like a screen that we are seeing the animal through, revealing how it is loved, feared, worshiped and also demonized by mankind. This imagery shows the ecological challenges that these species face and that require our attention in order to avoid their extinction.

The Breach series is based on photographs of Great White Sharks breaching whilst hunting and displaying their incredible physicality. They are a terrifying site yet also bare a sense of vulnerability out of the water and suspended in time like this. I have repeated the Jaws movie poster image across all pieces and there are other drawn elements around the sharks that relate to scare mongering ideas from the many other ‘shark movies’ made in recent years and the reality of what is pushing these incredible predators towards extinction.

The Great White Shark, 2019. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. 180 x 300 x 4 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Large Flying Fox, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 180 x 160 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Polar Bear, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 150 x 130 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Bengal Tiger, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 150 x 200 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Green Sea Turtle, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 170 x 150 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Bengal Tiger, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on plywood. 30 x 40 x 4 cm. Framed in obeche.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Gorilla, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 65 x 65 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Striped Hyena, 2019. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. 45 x 35 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Harpy Eagle. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche. 2019

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Gaur, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The African Elephant, 2019. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 65 x 65 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Blacktip reef shark, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 70 x 85 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Whale Shark, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 70 x 85 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Shortfin Mako Shark, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 70 x 85 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Eurasian Spoonbill, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on plywood. 46 x 35 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Eurasian Spoonbill is registered as least concern on the IUCN red list and therefore this drawing has not been erased.

The American Bison, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 45 x 65 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Great White Shark, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 50 x 40 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Sperm Whale, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 125 x 93 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

The Sperm Whale, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 125 x 93 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche. £2,600.

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Polar Bear, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 125 x 93 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche.

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Maned Wolf, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Giraffe, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Wandering Albatross, 2020. Ink and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 45 x 34 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.