Author Archives: TVHerrewege

The Great White Shark, 2019. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. 180 x 300 x 4 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Large Flying Fox, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 180 x 160 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Polar Bear, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 150 x 130 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Bengal Tiger, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 150 x 200 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Green Sea Turtle, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 170 x 150 cm.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Walrus, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on plywood. 30 x 40 x 4 cm. Framed in obeche.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

 

The Bengal Tiger, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on plywood. 30 x 40 x 4 cm. Framed in obeche.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The North Atlantic Right Whale, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on plywood. 40 x 30 x 4 cm. Framed in obeche.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Gorilla, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 65 x 65 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Striped Hyena, 2019. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. 45 x 35 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche.

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Maned Wolf, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Harpy Eagle. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche. 2019

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Gaur, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The African Elephant, 2019. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 65 x 65 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Blacktip reef shark, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 70 x 85 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Whale Shark, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 70 x 85 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Great Hammerhead Shark, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 70 x 85 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Shortfin Mako Shark, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 70 x 85 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Eurasian Spoonbill, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on plywood. 46 x 35 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Eurasian Spoonbill is registered as least concern on the IUCN red list and therefore this drawing has not been erased.

The American Bison, 2020. Graphite and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 45 x 65 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

The Great White Shark, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 50 x 40 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Sperm Whale, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 125 x 93 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

The Sperm Whale, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 125 x 93 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche. £2,600.

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Polar Bear, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 125 x 93 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche.

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Maned Wolf, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Giraffe, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 65 x 65 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Wandering Albatross, 2020. Ink and acrylic on plywood. Framed in white varnished obeche. 45 x 34 x 4 cm

I make figurative, realist drawings of animals. I spend hours working on a detailed drawing of an individual animal, and when I feel it is finished, I then erase away part or all the drawing to show how close the animal is to extinction. So, the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is erased away.
The actual erasing process is done through a variety of media and techniques on varying materials, including sanded away wooden panels, rubbed out images on canvas and washed away ink drawings. I aim to make the partially remaining drawings to be both beautiful yet alarming to the viewer.

Hit list

Over the last year, I have been working on a large series of artworks that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards and old encyclopedia pages, with some being over one hundred years old, and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This artist’s book contains the images of this series of artworks and visually reveals the devastating effects humans have had on the rest of the animal kingdom. There is also a text contribution by Oceanic Wildlife Conservation.

Pica pica

An artist’s exploration into the British and worldwide superstitions created around the Eurasian magpie. Why does this bird carry such attachments and how has it earned such a variety of superstitious belief based around it? This book contains images of artwork’s and texts made through researching these age old ideas.

Creature fady

Perceptions and understandings of the animal kingdom in Malagasy fady and folklore. An artist’s book that explores animal associated taboo’s in Madagascar. The book contains eight artwork’s that respond to these taboo’s, accompanying texts to describe each idea and also texts that describe the bizarre happenings on this very unusual research trip. This book also provides a strong message that emphasize’s the importance of conserving the flora and fauna of this unique island.

The Great White Shark, 2019. Graphite on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 50 x 40 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Binturong, 2019. Graphite and ink on white washed plywood that is then sanded. 45 x 60 x 4 cm. Framed in white varnished obeche

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled, Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and encyclopaedia pages that depict animals on them and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals’ image according to the individual species’ conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So, the closer the individual animal species depicted is to extinction, the more of its image is burned
away.

This idea works in the same way with the drawings on plywood. I carefully create the drawings of the animals as accurately as I can and then I immediately erase the drawing with sanding tools. These void spaces within the drawings are a metaphor for human impact on the natural world and a reminder that one day we will not be able to see these animals anymore.

The Elephant in the room

The elephant in the room is a triptych of large-scale artworks made at StudionAme, Leicester in 2020.

These big canvasses depict three individual Indian elephants rendered in charcoal and each elephant is drawn with a very different posture as if performing and interacting with a suggestive narrative.

Each charcoal drawing has been partially erased with line drawings and text that alludes to how elephants have been understood culturally across the world, throughout history and today.

Tom researches these ideas and then layers images and text to relate to the animal, to form a kind of screen that shows how these animals are understood and impacted by humanity.

The elephant in the room triptych

 

The elephant in the room (left), 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 240 x 300 cm.

 

The elephant in the room (left), 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 240 x 300 cm.

 

The elephant in the room (right), 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 240 x 300 cm.

 

Detail (Dumbo)

 

 

 

Tom in gallery

Erasing nature

Erasing nature

 

Erasing nature is a new development in my practice that encourages group collaboration in making artworks and generating content for these.

I make a large drawing of an animal species over a few days, and then when the piece is finished and I believe it to be convincing and representative of the animal, the erasing process then begins. This can be done by myself under the group’s instruction online, or this can be done with a group of people in a physical space.

Using the input and ideas from the group, the animal’s image is removed through writing, drawing and scribbling etc, by the group until the original drawing has become faded away enough to suggest its ecological status.

So, the closer the drawing is to vanishing- the closer the animal is to extinction in reality! It is a literal reminder that one day we may not be able to see these animals anymore.

These collaborative drawings act as a sounding board for the groups’ input and what people choose to add to the artwork is entirely up to them- it can be absolutely anything!

The underlying message here is that whilst people are so preoccupied with our own concerns and how various factors are affecting our own lives- these animals are disappearing because of the impact of humanity.

Hit List LCB Depot exhibition view.

 

The Great White Shark, 2019. Group collaborative piece made at LCB depot, Leicester 29/11/2019.

Hit List LCB Depot exhibition view.

 

 

 

The Giant Flying Fox, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas.  180 x 160 cm. Online collaborative piece.

 

 

The Ground Pangolin, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on plywood. 62 x 77 cm. Online collaborative piece.

 

 

The Chimpanzee, 2020. Charcoal and acrylic on canvas. 148 x 128 cm. Online collaborative piece.

 

 

 

Hit List

Since Spring 2017, I have been working on a large series of works that is titled Hit List. I have been sourcing different sets of old cigarette cards, bank notes and old encyclopedia pages, with some being over one hundred years old, and then I have been editing these by burning away the animals image according to the individual species’s conservation status on the IUCN red list of threatened species. So the closer the individual animal depicted on the card is to extinction, the more of its image is burned away.  The image is burned away because of the association to man and man kinds impact, being the only animal that can produce fire, but it is also a literal reminder that one day we may not be able to see these animals anymore.

The vast amount of the better known animals that are repeatedly depicted in these sets that are now very much threatened in the wild is really quite disturbing. Most of these cigarette cards only really depict the usually larger animals that are more popular and better known. If they were to depict more small animals such as amphibians, marine life and a huge variety of other species that go unconsidered, then the amount of burned away animal imagery in these cards would be far greater.